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Most people try to reduce their calorie intake by focusing on food, but another way to cut calories may be to think about what you drink.

Calories in drinks are not hidden (they're listed right on the Nutrition Facts label), but many people don't realize just how many calories beverages can contribute to their daily intake. As you can see in the example below, calories from drinks can really add up.

But there is good news: you have plenty of options for reducing the number of calories in what you drink.
Substituting no- or low-calorie drinks for sugar-sweetened beverages cuts about 650 calories in the example above.
Check the list below to estimate how many calories you typically take in from beverages.

Most people try to reduce their calorie intake by focusing on food, but another way to cut calories may be to change what you drink. You may find that you're consuming quite a few calories just in the beverages you have each day.

Find out how you can make better drink choices to reduce your calorie intake.
Milk contains vitamins and other nutrients that contribute to good health, but it also contains calories.

Choosing low-fat or fat-free milk is a good way to reduce your calorie intake and still get the nutrients that milk contains.
Learn To Read Nutrition Facts Labels Carefully

Be aware that the Nutrition Facts label on beverage containers may give the calories for only part of the contents.
The example below shows the label on a 20-oz. bottle. As you can see, it lists the number of calories in an 8-oz. serving (100) even though the bottle contains 20 oz. or 2.5 servings.

To figure out how many calories are in the whole bottle, you need to multiply the number of calories in one serving by the number of servings in the bottle (100 x 2.5).

You can see that the contents of the entire bottle actually contain 250 calories even though what the label calls a "serving" only contains 100. This shows that you need to look closely at the serving size when comparing the calorie content of different beverages.
Sugar by Any Other Name: How To Tell Whether Your Drink Is Sweetened

Sweeteners that add calories to a beverage go by many different names and are not always obvious to anyone looking at the ingredients list. Some common caloric sweeteners are listed below. If these appear in the ingredients list of your favorite beverage, you are drinking a sugar-sweetened beverage.

• High-fructose corn syrup
• Fructose
• Fruit juice concentrates
• Honey
• Sugar
• Syrup
• Corn syrup
• Sucrose
• Dextrose
High-Calorie Culprits in Unexpected Places

Coffee drinks and blended fruit smoothies sound innocent enough, but the calories in some of your favorite coffee-shop or smoothie-stand items may surprise you. Check the Web site or in-store nutrition information of your favorite coffee or smoothie shop to find out how many calories are in different menu items.
And when a smoothie or coffee craving kicks in, here are some tips to help minimize the caloric damage:
At the coffee shop:

• Request that your drink be made with fat-free or low-fat milk instead of whole milk
• Order the smallest size available.
• Forgo the extra flavoring - the flavor syrups used in coffee shops, like vanilla or hazelnut, are sugar-sweetened and will add calories
to your drink.
• Skip the Whip. The whipped cream on top of coffee drinks adds calories and fat.
• Get back to basics. Order a plain cup of coffee with fat-free milk and artificial sweetener, or drink it black.

At the smoothie stand:

• Order a child's size if available.
• Ask to see the nutrition information for each type of smoothie and pick the smoothie with the fewest calories.
• Hold the sugar. Many smoothies contain added sugar in addition to the sugar naturally in fruit, juice, or yogurt.
Ask that your smoothie be prepared without added sugar: the fruit is naturally sweet.

Better Beverage Choices Made Easy
Now that you know how much difference a drink can make, here are some ways to make smart beverage choices:

• Choose water, diet, or low-calorie beverages instead of sugar-sweetened beverages.
• For a quick, easy, and inexpensive thirst-quencher, carry a water bottle and refill it throughout the day.
• Don't "stock the fridge" with sugar-sweetened beverages. Instead, keep a jug or bottles of cold water in the fridge.
• Serve water with meals.
• Make water more exciting by adding slices of lemon, lime, cucumber, or watermelon, or drink sparkling water.
• Add a splash of 100% juice to plain sparkling water for a refreshing, low-calorie drink.
• When you do opt for a sugar-sweetened beverage, go for the small size. Some companies are now selling 8-oz. cans and bottles of
soda, which contain about 100 calories.
• Be a role model for your friends and family by choosing healthy, low-calorie beverages.